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Feb 15

CUBAO 888 TOWNHOUSES – 9 UNITS PRE-SELLING

Cubao, south of Diliman is an important commercial area. At its heart is the Araneta Center along EDSA (C-4) and Aurora Boulevard (R-6). It is a 35-hectare commercial estate owned and developed by the Araneta family. Department stores and retail centers can also be found here, such as Gateway Mall, Plaza Fair, Rustan’s, Shopwise Supercenter, SM Cubao, Ali Mall, and Farmer’s Plaza. At the center is Smart Araneta Coliseum, often called the Big Dome. Many musical concerts, ice shows, circus shows, religious crusades, wrestling, cockfighting, and basketball games are held in this 20,000-capacity coliseum. In the outskirts of Araneta Center is the Cubao Expo, an artists’ colony and site of weekend flea markets. It is also a home to call centers like APAC, Telus, and Stellar.

Cubao is also the home of the Cubao Cathedral the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cubao. SM Hypermarket is located just outside the Araneta Center, along EDSA. Nightclubs also abound within the Cubao area, catering to a full range of tastes. There are residential areas ranging from the middle class to the upper class. Araneta Center is also home to the Consulate of the Republic of Colombia.

North from Araneta Center along EDSA (C-4) are numerous bus terminals, a place where one can take a bus ride to almost any point in Luzon, Visayas or Mindanao. It is also an intersection point for two of city’s commuter train lines (the MRT-3 and the LRT-2).[citation needed]

9 UNITS 3 Storey Townhouses For Sale

30% DP PAYABLE IN 20 MONTHS

P100K RESERVATION FEE as part of the 30% DP

LOCATION: 11th Avenue, Baranggay Socorro, Cubao, Quezon City

HOUSE SPECIFICATIONS:


  • Three (3) Storey Townhouse
  • Floor Area: 75-90 sq.m.
  • Lot Area: 32-40 sq.m.
  • Three (3) Bedrooms
  • Three (3) Toilet and Bath
  • One (1) – Two (2) car garage
  • Laundry/Service Area
SAMPLE COMPUTATION UNIT NO. AVAIL. LOT AREA FLOOR AREA RESERV. DP (30%) 70% BAL.
4.5M A,B,F,G 40.0sqm 90.0sqm 100,000       1,350,000      3,150,000
4.350M I 34.34sqm 75.0sqm 100,000       1,305,000      3,045,000
4.2M C,D,E,H 32.0sqm 75.0sqm 100,000       1,260,000      2,940,000

 FLOOR PLAN

LOT PLANSAMPLE COMPUTATION SHEET

 

TURNOVER PROJECTS

Quezon City (Filipino: Lungsod Quezon) is the former capital (1948–1976) and the most populous city in the Philippines. Located on the island of Luzon, Quezon City (popularly known to Filipinos as QC) is one of the cities that make up Metro Manila, the National Capital Region. The city was named after Manuel L. Quezon, President of the Philippines, who founded the city and developed it to replace Manila as the country’s capital. Quezon City is not located in and should not be confused with Quezon province, which was also named after the president.

Having been the national capital, Quezon City is the site of many government offices, including the Batasang Pambansa Complex, the seat of the House of Representatives, which is the lower chamber in the Philippine Congress. The main campuses of two noteworthy universities, the Ateneo de Manila University and the country’s national university, the University of the Philippines Diliman, are located in the city.

Before Quezon City was created, it was composed of small individual towns. These were San Francisco del Monte, Novaliches, and Balintawak. On August 23, 1896, the Katipunan led by Andres Bonifacio declared a revolution against Spain in the house of Melchora Aquino in Pugad Lawin (now known as Bahay Toro, Project 8). In the early 20th century, President Manuel L. Quezon dreamt of a city that would become the future capital of the country to replace Manila. It is believed that his earlier trip to Mexico influenced his vision.

In 1938, President Quezon created People’s Homesite Corporation and purchased 15.29 km2 (6 sq mi) from the vast Diliman estate of the Tuason family (This piece of land became known as Bario Obrero “Home of the Middle Workers” before a name change to Quezon City). The National Assembly of the Philippine Commonwealth passed Commonwealth Act 502 known as the Charter of Quezon City originally proposed as Balintawak City, Assemblymen Narciso Ramos (father of President Fidel V. Ramos) and Ramon Mitra, Sr. (father of Speaker Ramon Mitra, Jr.) successfully lobbied the assembly to name the city after the incumbent president. President Quezon allowed the bill to lapse into law without his signature on October 12, 1939, thus establishing Quezon City.

After the war, Republic Act No. 333 which redefined the Caloocan-Quezon City boundary was signed by Elpidio Quirino on July 17, 1948 declaring Quezon City to be the republic’s capital, and specifying the city’s area to be 156.60 km2 (60 sq mi). Baesa, Talipapa, San Bartolome, Pasong Tamo, Novaliches Poblacion, Banlat, Kabuyao, Pugad Lawin, Bagbag, Pasong Putik which formerly belonged to Novaliches and had an area of about 8,100 hectares, were taken from Caloocan and ceded to Quezon City. This caused the division of Caloocan into two separate parts, the South section being the urbanized part, the North section being sub-rural. On June 16, 1950, the Quezon City Charter was revised by Republic Act No. 537, changing the city’s boundaries to an area of 153.59 km2 (59 sq mi).

Exactly six years after on June 16, 1956, more revisions to the city’s land area were made by Republic Act No. 1575, which defined its area as 151.06 km2 (58 sq mi). The website of the Quezon City government states that its present area is 161.12 km2 (62 sq mi) On October 1, 1975, Quezon City was the actual site of the “Thrilla in Manila” fight between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier. On November 7, 1975 the promulgation of Presidential Decree No. 824 of President Ferdinand Marcos established Metro Manila.

Quezon City became one of Metro Manila’s 17 cities and municipalities. The next year, Presidential Decree No. 940 transferred the capital back to Manila on June 24, 1976. On March 31, 1978, President Ferdinand Marcos ordered the transfer of the remains of President Manuel L. Quezon from the Manila North Cemetery to the erected Quezon Memorial Monument within the Quezon Elliptical Road. Manuel L. Quezon Monument and the City Hall. On February 22, 1986, the Quezon City portion of the Epifanio de los Santos Avenue became the venue of the bloodless People Power Revolution. On February 23, 1998, Republic Act. No. 8535 was signed by President Fidel V. Ramos.

The Act provided for the creation of the City of Novaliches comprising the 15 northernmost barangays of Quezon city. However, in the succeeding plebiscite on October 23, 1999, an overwhelming majority of Quezon City residents rejected the secession of Novaliches. Quezon City is the first local government in the Philippines with a computerized real estate assessment and payment system. The city government developed a database system that now contains around 400,000 property units with capability to record payments.

Geography

The city lies on the Guadalupe plateau which is a relatively high plateau on the northeast corner of the metropolis – between the lowlands of Manila to the southwest and the Marikina River valley to the east. The southern portion is drained by the very narrow San Juan River and its tributaries to Pasig River, while running in the northern portions of the city is the equally narrow Tullahan River.

Quezon City is bordered by Manila to the southwest, by Caloocan and Valenzuela City to the west and northwest. To the south lies San Juan and Mandaluyong, while Marikina and Pasig borders Quezon City to the southeast. To the north across Marilao River lies San Jose del Monte in the province of Bulacan and to the east lies Rodriguez and San Mateo, both in the province of Rizal.

The city can be divided into a number of areas. The southern portion of the city is divided into a number of places including Diliman, Commonwealth, the Project areas, Cubao, Kamias, Kamuning, New Manila, San Francisco del Monte, and Santa Mesa Heights. The northern half of the city is often called Novaliches and contains the areas of Fairview and Lagro. Most of these areas have no defined boundaries and are primarily residential in nature.

Climate

Quezon City features a tropical monsoon climate, with warm weather and dry and wet seasons.

Economy

The commercial center of the city is in Cubao where many shopping malls and the Aurora Tower can be found. There is a farmers’ plaza and farmers’ market. Fiesta Carnival was an enclosed amusement park cum carnival which is located in the heart of the Cubao Commercial Center, it has since been replaced by a branch of Shopwise, a local supermarket chain. You will also find the Araneta Coliseum, a venue for concerts as well as sports events.

Quezon City is home to the Philippines’ major broadcasting networks. Television companies such as TV5, ABS-CBN, GMA Network, INC TV, UNTV, Net 25, PTV, RPN, and IBC all have their headquarters in Quezon City.

Tomas Morato and Timog Avenues are the heart of a restaurant and entertainment row with a wide array of prices, cultures, and flavors while Banawe Avenue is dubbed as the Autoparts Capital of the Philippines because of the concentration of car parts shops and accessories and home to clusters of authentic Chinese restaurants aside from Binondo. The tallest building in the city is a 40 storey Eastwood Parkview located in Eastwood City.

Sub-divisions/Districts

Political map of Quezon City

Quezon City is divided into four districts composed about 142 barangays. Each district is represented by six City Councilors, four representatives/congressmen, one from each district are elected as members of the National Legislature. The number of barangays per district is: District I, 37; District II, 28; District III, 37; and District IV, 38. Although District II has the least number of barangays, it is the biggest in land area, including the Novaliches Reservoir. The La Mesa Ecopark in Novaliches is the last forest of its size in the metropolis, the La Mesa Dam is an earth dam whose reservoir can hold up to 50.5 million cubic meters and occupying an area of 27 square kilometers, it is also part of the AngatIpo-La Mesa water system which supplies most of the water supply of Metro Manila.

Communications

Quezon City’s communication system is powered by the PLDT, Globe Telecom, BayanTel, and others. Cellular networking in the Philippines, particularly the metropolitan areas, is increasing rapidly together with the low cost of calls and text messaging. Such big companies that control the cellular networks in the Philippines and Quezon City itself are Globe Telecom, Smart Communications (PLDT) and Sun Cellular from Digitel.

Education

The city has several major educational institutions. Two of the most well-known are the Ateneo de Manila University and the University of the Philippines Diliman. Also in Quezon City are medical schools such as the Our Lady of Fatima University, Far Eastern University – Nicanor Reyes Medical Foundation, Capitol Medical Center Colleges, and the University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center. The Technological Institute of the Philippines, one of the top engineering schools in the Philippines, Polytechnic University of the Philippines also has an extension campus in Commonwealth area. The city government operates the Quezon City Polytechnic University, which has campuses in Novaliches, Batasan Hills, and Barangay Sto. Cristo. Business and management schools include Entrepreneurs School of Asia located in Libis, Philippine School of Business Administration (PSBA), and National College of Business and Arts (NCBA). Popular women’s colleges such as St. Theresa’s College of Quezon City, St. Pedro Poveda College (formerly known as Poveda Learning Center), and Miriam College are also found in the city. Sectarian schools such as the Catholic Siena College of Quezon City, St. Paul University of Quezon City, St. Mary’s College of Quezon City, St. Joseph’s College of Quezon City, Colegio de San Lorenzo, Angelicum College, Shepherd’s Grace School, the Episcopal Trinity University of Asia, and the Iglesia ni Cristo–affiliated New Era University are also found in the city. Other schools include Kalayaan College, the Central Colleges of the Philippines, Philippine Rehabilitation Institute, the main branch of the AMA Computer University, and numerous campuses of information technology schools such as Asia School of Arts & Sciences (ASAS), Informatics International College, and STI College.

Notable secondary public schools include Philippine Science High School Main Campus, Quezon City Science High School, Commonwealth High School, Ernesto Rondon High School, Don Alejandro Roces Sr. Science-Technology High School, Batasan Hills National High School, and the University of the Philippines Integrated School. Quezon City also holds the largest number of private elementary and secondary schools in Metro Manila, such as St. James College of Quezon City Angelicum College, Ateneo de Manila Grade School and High School, Claret School of Quezon City, Sacred Heart Academy (with branches in La Loma and Novaliches), Diliman Preparatory School, Miriam College Grade School and High School, School of the Holy Spirit, School of Saint Anthony, Jose Abad Santos Memorial School PWU-JASMS in Edsa., Mater Carmeli School, Grace Christian High School, Quezon City Christian Academy, Lourdes School of Quezon City, Our Lady of Fatima University, Falcon School (Quezon City), Marian School of Quezon City, Divine Grace School, Holy Family School, St. Bridget School, Quezon City Academy. The diocesan schools are the Immaculate Concepcion Cathedral School (Diocese of Cubao) and Good Shepherd Cathedral School (Diocese of Novaliches). Many Catholic parishes also operate parochial schools of their own as well.

Transportation

Railways

Currently, two elevated light rail systems and one heavy rail system run through Quezon City: LRT 1 – at EDSA (C-4) connecting North Avenue and Baclaran (Manila) LRT 2 – at Aurora Boulevard (R-6) connecting Santolan (Pasig City) and C.M.Recto Avenue (Manila), and MRT 3 – at EDSA (C-4) from Taft Avenue (R-2 in Pasay City) to North Avenue.

An elevated rail transit system (MRT-4) that was supposed to follow the general alignment of Quezon and Commonwealth Avenues (R-7) was shelved. In its place, a 22 kilometer rail system will be built. The MRT-7 project will commence at North Avenue, connecting the MRT-3 at its northern terminus. It will then go through Commonwealth Avenue, then through Regalado, Quirino Highway, ending in San Jose del Monte, Bulacan. The system has a proposed spur line to connect itself to MRT-2 in Katipunan, passing through the University of the Philippines Diliman and Katipunan Avenue.

A elevated UP Diliman Monorail, also known as Automated Guideway Transit is now currently under construction that will rise at the end of this year, the first monorail system in the Philippines.

The following elevated railway stations in the city (Only 13 Stations):

Katipunan Avenue, a major road in Quezon City.

Quezon Avenue, a major thoroughfare in Quezon City.

MRT-3 (with 5 Stations):

LRT-2 (with 5 Stations):

LRT-1 (with 3 Stations)

Public Transport

Public transportation within the city, like in most of the urban areas in the Philippines, is facilitated mostly using inexpensive jeepneys and buses. Tricycles give access to more secluded areas, while taxi cabs are available to navigate any course.

This City has 3 Circumferential Roads. The following are:

  • C-3: Sgt. Emilio Rivera Avenue and Araneta Avenue
  • C-4: Epifanio de los Santos Avenue or EDSA
  • C-5: Mindanao Avenue, Tandang Sora Avenue, Congressional Avenue Extension, Katipunan Avenue and Col. Bonny Serrano Avenue.

For the list of other Quezon City Major Roads, see Major roads in Metro Manila

For your inquiry :

JANET C. BORJA Lic. Broker #12180
+639178289128 / +639228289128 / +639399289128
anginett@gmail.com  /  janet@philsproperty.com
YM: anginett888
SKYPE: janetborja

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